Interlake Gimli Klean-All Laundry Poetry Contest Winners

There were 52 entries in the 2016 Interlake Gimli Klean-All Laundry Poetry Contest, including submissions from the entire Gimli Grade Nine English Class. The contest was created by the Lake Winnipeg Writers’ Group, the Klean-All Laundry, and the Envoi Literary Foundation, recognizing National Poetry Month, occurring every April in North America.

The entries included submissions from an entire Grade Nine English Class. Of these four caught the attention of the judge Victor Enns, the Interlake Gimli Laundry Poet-in-Residence “I was impressed by the general level of submissions from this class, but these four appealed to me.”  The finalists were –

  • “The legend of the disappearing pick,” by Cody Stevenson with the makings of a good rap lyric,
  • “The girl nobody sees,” by Avery, one of the longest poems in the contest with a very strong ending,
  • “Road Trip” by Evan Thorklason, about a long and winding road trip to Lynn Lake and the winner,
  • “Road” by Caylin Riddle who wins the Tergesen Poetry Gift Certificate, in recognition of national poetry month.
    “Her point of view, that of the road itself showed originality and made this entry unique,” said Enns.

Kristine A Dubois, one of teachers, impressed with her “Coming Clean at the Klean-All,” winning the inaugural Klean-All Laundry Poetry Prize ($20.00 of free wash-and-dry laundry) and a subscription to Rhubarb magazine. The poem will be posted in a place of honour in the Laundromat until next year.

There were several poems about Mother’s Day, which occurred during the contest. “I really enjoyed a different take with the song lyrics ‘Psycho Mother.’ Most of us have visited the territory in our own parenting,” laughed Enns. Heather Joan Sloan wins a gift subscription to CV2, a Canadian poetry magazine published in Winnipeg.

Irene Shaw from Gunton, was the only double winner. She visited the Poet-in-Residence in residence at the Klean-All regularly, understanding the importance of revision. “She brought a lot of poems and worked very hard, much improving, for example “Seal Hunt,” for which she will receive a gift subscription to Prairie Fire magazine.” Shaw also wins a subscription to CV2 for her startling submission “Grave Dream.”

The “better late than never” prize goes to Adam Peleshaty, from Stonewall, for “A Superhero’s Progression,” which I almost missed as one the four poems he submitted. Adam wins a copy of
Why Poetry Sucks, An Anthology of Humourous Experimental Canadian Poetry.

Congratulations to the winners and all entrants. Every one is welcome to read their work at the monthly Poetry Slam at the Ship and Plough on Wednesday, Mat 25th beginning at 7:30 pm.

Thanks to our supporters, Tergesen’s, Klean-All Laundry, Prairie Fire, CV2 and Rhubarb magazine, and the Ship and Plough host to a monthly night of poetry.

Contact: Victor Enns Klean-All Poet in Residence, envoi@shaw.ca, 204-641.0821 cell, 204-642-8633 home.

 

Ezra Pound’s summary of the new poetics 1913

“In the spring or early summer of 1912, ‘H.D’, Richard Aldington, and myself decided we were agreed upon the three principles following:

Ezra Pound 1939 Wyndham Lewis 1882-1957 Purchased 1939 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N05042

Ezra Pound 1939 Wyndham Lewis 1882-1957 Purchased 1939, Tate Gallery, London

(1) Direct treatment of the ‘thing’ whether subjective or objective.
(2) To use absolutely no word that does not contribute to the presentation.
(3) As regarding rhythm: to compose in the sequence of the musical phrase, not in the sequence of a metronome.”

These, and many other lessons on poetics, were taught by Ted (WorDoctor) Dyck. In addition to myself the workshop participants where Mick Burrs, Anne Campbell, Gerald Hill, Elizabeth Phillips, Bruce Rice, Susan Rodning, Jerry Rush, Brenda Riches, Susan Andrews and Paul Wilson.

Victor Enns writes poetry, reads,and reviews fiction. Boy (Hagios 2012) was published in May, and Lucky Man, (Hagios 2005) was short-listed for the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award.

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